Feature Articles

2013 Fall Carlisle Round-Up: One of the Hobby’s Largest All-Around Swap Meets

By Fred “Buzz” Quillen

 2013 Fall Carlisle, Auto Round-Up, Largest Swap Meets, Classic cars, 2013 Carlisle Collector Swap Meet, Corral, Auction, classic car fanatics, Carlisle Events, old car enthusiasts, Carlisle fairgrounds, old car parts, 1965 Mustang, memorabilia and collectibles, thousands of classic cars, Bel Air, incredible 1972 Plymouth Road Runner, Carlisle fall swap meetClassic cars, fresh oil, food, and fun were the things I will remember about the 2013 Carlisle Collector Swap Meet, Corral, and Auction. The show this year was held Oct. 2-6 on the 150 acre show grounds with over 8,100 official vending spaces displayed. I was amazed at the turnout of vehicles for sale this year and the sheer number of classic car fanatics. There were over 2,000 vehicles for sale as well as the popular car auctions. Celebrating it’s 40th year, Carlisle Events put on a show that satisfied over 200,000 spectators for the week-long swap meet.

The day was perfect for this gathering of old car enthusiasts because while the forecast said there was a chance of rain, the weekend was blessed with dry and cool weather. I originally went down to the Carlisle fairgrounds to pick up a few old car parts, but then, like every other person there, I forgot to leave. I spent hours walking around and admiring the vehicles and even found a completed version of my pet project–a 1965 Mustang. I spent the day getting lost in the crowds and the excitement and when it was time to leave and I realized I had not seen everything, I made plans to come back the following day.

 2013 Fall Carlisle, Auto Round-Up, Largest Swap Meets, Classic cars, 2013 Carlisle Collector Swap Meet, Corral, Auction, classic car fanatics, Carlisle Events, old car enthusiasts, Carlisle fairgrounds, old car parts, 1965 Mustang, memorabilia and collectibles, thousands of classic cars, Bel Air, incredible 1972 Plymouth Road Runner, Carlisle fall swap meetFrom sun up till sun down, the grounds were strewn with wide-eyed children and adults, marveling at the achievements of the automotive industry, shopping for memorabilia and collectibles, and eating from the many vendors who showed up.

I loved the fact that there were not only thousands of classic cars, but also, food, the horse track, race tracks, and loads of amazing memorabilia. These collectibles ranged from automotive history to old bicycles to new and old signs and thousands of other cool items.

Walking around the show, you can get parts for your project cars, or just admire all the vehicles or listen to people haggling over parts and prices while eating a delicious Philly cheesesteak. It was amazing to see people from all over the United States and the world over gathering together and sharing their love for the show, entertainment, and cars.

 2013 Fall Carlisle, Auto Round-Up, Largest Swap Meets, Classic cars, 2013 Carlisle Collector Swap Meet, Corral, Auction, classic car fanatics, Carlisle Events, old car enthusiasts, Carlisle fairgrounds, old car parts, 1965 Mustang, memorabilia and collectibles, thousands of classic cars, Bel Air, incredible 1972 Plymouth Road Runner, Carlisle fall swap meetWalking down the dusty streets, with the music playing, and car engines revving, was quite an experience. I stopped and admired a beautiful 1957 Chevy Bel Air and started chatting with an older German/American couple who came back to the U.S. for the Carlisle show. He proposed to her at the 1978 show and so they decided to celebrate their 35th wedding anniversary and buy themselves a Bel Air like he had when they first met.

 2013 Fall Carlisle, Auto Round-Up, Largest Swap Meets, Classic cars, 2013 Carlisle Collector Swap Meet, Corral, Auction, classic car fanatics, Carlisle Events, old car enthusiasts, Carlisle fairgrounds, old car parts, 1965 Mustang, memorabilia and collectibles, thousands of classic cars, Bel Air, incredible 1972 Plymouth Road Runner, Carlisle fall swap meetIt was great to see the legacy of the show and the significance it holds for everyone who attends. Whether you remember it as a child growing up and falling in love with cars like the incredible 1972 Plymouth Road Runner, like I did, or whether you proposed to your wife of 35 years at the show, there is always something for everyone. The Carlisle fall swap meet definitely embodied everything American: family, fun, food, and community. The Carlisle Show this year was definitely an amazing weekend experience and I cannot wait to go back again next year in the spring.

THE 25TH SPRING DAYTONA TURKEY RUN WELCOMES SUPER HERO CELEBRITIES

THE 25TH SPRING DAYTONA TURKEY RUN WELCOMES SUPER HERO CELEBRITIES

DAYTONA BEACH, FL. (March 21, 2014) – The Spring Daytona Turkey Run celebrates its 25th anniversary by welcoming beautiful classic cars, a massive swap meet, arts/fashion bazaar and super hero sized fun! The family event kicks off at 8 a.m. on Friday, March 28th at the Daytona International Speedway, and runs through Sunday, March 30th. The 2014 Spring Daytona Turkey Run would like to announce the following entertainment figures are available for interviews before and during the event.

Captain Eugene Nock from the Batcopter Batmobile Airshow and Museum. Captain Nock is leading the super hero style celebration by showcasing the original Batcopter N3079G from the Batman TV Series as well as the 1966 Batmobile and Batcycle.

The King BMX Stunt Show, as seen on “America’s Got Talent,” will be performing three shows on Saturday, March 29th at 10AM, 11:30AM and 1:00PM. Owner, Keith King competed in the 1997 and 1998 X Games and continues to perform with other
top riders in the world-class BMX shows. Wikked Steel unveils their Iron Man custom motorcycle. Wikked Steel owner, Steve Galvin, is a Saint Petersburg based builder of extreme custom motorcycles, pushing the envelope of design and fabrication.

The Spring Daytona Turkey Run is open to the public and features thousands of vintage, classic, muscle cars, race cars and trucks on display and for sale, as well as a massive swap meet in which vendors sell and trade hard-to-find auto parts and accessories. There is also an Arts and Fashion Bazaar with hand crafted art and a full midway of delicious food vendors.

The Turkey Run is sponsored in part by Bright House Networks and Miller Lite. Admission is $10 Friday and Saturday and $5 on Sunday with free parking. Children under 11 are free when accompanied by an adult. Show hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday.

More information can be found at www.TurkeyRun.com or by downloading the new Daytona Turkey Run App available on both iPhone and Android.

THE 25TH SPRING DAYTONA TURKEY RUN CELEBRATES A SUPER HERO SIZED CLASSIC CAR SHOW

THE 25TH SPRING DAYTONA TURKEY RUN CELEBRATES
A SUPER HERO SIZED CLASSIC CAR SHOW

DAYTONA BEACH, FL. (March 14, 2014) – The Spring Daytona Turkey Run celebrates its 25th
anniversary by welcoming beautiful classic cars, a massive swap meet, arts/fashion bazaar
and BATMAN! The family event kicks off at 8 a.m. on Friday, March 28th at the Daytona
International Speedway, and runs through Sunday, March 30th.

The 2014 Spring Daytona Turkey Run welcomes Captain Eugene Nock from the
Batcopter Batmobile Airshow and Museum. Captain Nock is leading the super hero style
celebration by showcasing the original Batcopter N3079G from the Batman TV Series as well
as the 1966 Batmobile and Batcycle.

In addition, guests will also enjoy:

1. King BMX Stunt Show as seen on “America’s Got Talent” on Saturday, March 29th.
King BMX performs high-intensity, action packed stunts and is the premier action
sports team for halftime shows. Show times are 10AM, 11:30AM and 1PM.

2. Wikked Steel unveils their Iron Man custom motorcycle. Wikked Steel is a Saint
Petersburg based builder of extreme custom motorcycles, pushing the envelope of
design and fabrication.

3. Celebration of the 50th birthday of the iconic Mustang car with the special Spring
Daytona Turkey Run Mustang Corral and Mustang Trot around the track on Friday,
March 28th at 2PM.

4. Kids Super Hero Tent loaded with super hero fun for the kids. Free treats, goodie
bags, gaming challenges by Best Buy, super hero characters and more.

The 25th Spring Daytona Turkey Run Celebrates a Super Hero Sized Event p/2 of 2
“The 2014 Spring Daytona Turkey Run is a celebration of both our devoted classic car
lovers and youthful future fans,” says Barbara Kelly, General Manager with Daytona Beach
Car Shows. “The show has always been a family event but this year we’ve gone above and
beyond to make sure the kids feel like their own special super heros.”

The Spring Daytona Turkey Run is open to the public and features thousands of
vintage, classic, muscle cars, race cars and trucks on display and for sale, as well as a
massive swap meet in which vendors sell and trade hard-to-find auto parts and accessories.
There is also an Arts and Fashion Bazaar with hand crafted art and a full midway of delicious
food vendors.

The Turkey Run is sponsored in part by Bright House Networks and Miller Lite. Admission
is $10 Friday and Saturday and $5 on Sunday with free parking. Children under 11 are free
when accompanied by an adult. Show hours are 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 8
a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday.

More information can be found at www.TurkeyRun.com or by downloading the new
Daytona Turkey Run App available on both iPhone and Android.

1938 Cadillac V-16

1938 Cadillac V-16
A One-Of-A-Kind, Custom-Built Limo with 16 Cylinders

What a great classic! This beautiful fastback ’38 Cadillac was custom-crafted for William S. Knudsen, then-president of General Motors Corporation, at an undisclosed cost. Since most V-16 Cadillacs were then priced in the $6,000-plus range, this one-of-a-kind, widened and lengthened limousine (with an electrically controlled glass dividing window between chauffeur and passengers) probably cost more than $10,000!

Mr. Knudsen relinquished the use of this car for a time, so it could be displayed at the 1939 New York World’s Fair.

1938 Cadillac V-16, Custom-Built Limo with 16 Cylinders, Tad Burness, Auto Round-Up, classic, beautiful fastback '38 Cadillac, V-16 Cadillacs, William S. Knudsen, president of General Motors Corporation, V-12s from 1931 to 1937, V-16s from 1930 to 1940, side valves (L-head), OHV version, 1993 Concours d' Elegance at Pebble Beach, Pebble Beach in 2005Cadillac, in addition to its V-8s, also offered V-12s from 1931 to 1937 and V-16s from 1930 to 1940. Until 1937, the V-16s had overhead valves, but the ’38 to ’40 models switched to side valves (L-head), the very opposite of what most manufacturers eventually would do. The L-head engine was produced by virtually no one after the 1960s. Overhead-valve and overhead-cam engines have been the thing since then. By the way, the reworked Cadillac V-16 engine of the 1938 model was spread out at a much wider V angle than before. True to its form, the L-head engine was much quieter than the new OHV version.

Mr. Knudsen lived from 1879 to 1948, and his car has passed through several hands since then. Completely restored, it was shown at the 1993 Concours d’ Elegance at Pebble Beach, CA, then put up for auction at Pebble Beach in 2005, where it was expected to fetch $250,000-$300,000. Not a bad estimate, as it sold for $297,000 to an American collector, according to the auctioneers (whom I telephoned).

1971 Matador

1971 MATADOR
A GOOD CAR, BUT NOT A GOOD CHOICE FOR NAME

American Motors Corporation was known to create, and later drop, its various makes of cars as it felt the market dictated. Rambler, Gremlin, American, Javelin, Classic, Ambassador, Marlin, Pacer, Concord, Hornet, AMX – well, you get the idea! The list of AMC brand names is long, and in 1971, AMC switched its Rebel for a new car: the Matador. Available as a 6 or V8, the Matador was a hefty car, somewhat conservative in style (until a new, streamlined coupe appeared in 1974, but that’s another story).

1971 Matador, Tad Burness, Auto Round-Up, Tad Burness, American Motors Corporation, Rambler, Gremlin, American, Javelin, Classic, Ambassador, Marlin, Pacer, Concord, Hornet, AMX, AMC brand names, Rebel, V8, streamlined coupe, If you had to compete with GM Ford and Chrysler what would you do, Ford Torino, Chevrolet Chevelle, Malibu, Plymouth Satellite, two-door hardtop, four-door sedan, four-door wagon, bull-killer, 1978, 1979Pacer, Concord, SpiritAMC’s 1971 slogan was: “If you had to compete with GM, Ford and Chrysler, what would you do?” AMC’s answer was to offer a variety of makes and models, just as its bigger rivals were doing.

AMC advertised that its new Matador was roomier than a Ford Torino, Chevrolet Chevelle (Malibu) or a Plymouth Satellite – with a longer wheelbase than all three. AMC cars were rustproofed from floor to roof, and featured see-through batteries so that one could know if the battery needed water without opening the caps. High-intensity headlights would still glow, even if burned out!

The ’71 Matador was available as a two-door hardtop (shown here), a four-door sedan or a four-door wagon. The Matador was advertised as “a family car that can be glamorous,” and in many ads was illustrated with children and parents in or around the car.

The only problem with the Matador was the name. Would it appeal to Hispanics? “Matador” in Spanish means “bull-killer,” “killer” or, as an adjective, “killing.” Perhaps this is one of the reasons the Matador was discontinued after 1978. For 1979, AMC concentrated on smaller cars, such as its ultrastreamlined Pacer, its Concord and the new compact Spirit (which replaced the Gremlin).

1928 L&E

1928 L&E
ONE OF THE RAREST CARS TO EMERGE FROM SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA IN THE 1920s

The Los Angeles partnership of Lundelius & Eccleston began in 1922, and in 1924 they introduced their first vehicle, a Franklin-based touring car. But in between times, they based their L&E cars on other brands, probably hoping to spark those manufacturers’ interest in L&E’s eight years of production. There could have been more, but who knows?

1928 L&E, ONE OF THE RAREST CARS, 1920s, Tad Burness, Auto Round-Up, Los Angeles partnership of Lundelius & Eccleston, 1922, 1924, Franklin-based touring car, 1928 model, Auburn, Cadillac, Roaring '20s, Lincoln and Chrysler, axle-less, ever heard of L&E carThe illustrated 1928 model was a fine-looking car, showing styling influences of Auburn, Cadillac and some other quality marques. It was obviously in the luxury class and would probably have sold for $3,500 or more, if production had commenced. L&E had big plans for a huge factory in Long Beach (close to Los Angeles), but that project failed to get off the ground. During the Roaring ’20s, many new brands of cars were introduced, or at least, announced. Only a few achieved success (Lincoln and Chrysler are two examples), but many more were sunk before they set sail. Some would-be brands of cars were simply stock manipulations, and a few such greedy ventures landed their perpetrators behind bars.

The L&E venture was apparently honest. A few cars were built, but the “axle-less” idea was too eccentric to catch on. So, don’t be surprised if you’ve never heard of the L&E before, even if you live in or near Los Angeles.

1960 Rambler Six Custom

1960 RAMBLER SIX CUSTOM
UP AGAINST THE BIG THREE, AMC FOUGHT THE GOOD FIGHT

For a comparatively small auto manufacturer, American Motors Corp. did an admirable job in trying to keep up with America’s powerful “Big Three” (General Motors, Ford and Chrysler) by offering a variety of models and sizes.

The smallest of AMC’s 1960 offerings was the British-American Metropolitan subcompact, available as a tiny coupe or convertible, with a four-cylinder British Austin engine. Then came the Rambler American, a small six on a compact 100-inch wheelbase, available in Deluxe, Super or Custom models.

1960 Rambler Six Custom, Tad Burness, Auto Round-Up, American Motors Corp, AMC, Big Three, General Motors, Ford, Chrysler, AMC's 1960, British-American Metropolitan subcompact, convertible, four-cylinder British Austin engine, Rambler American, Deluxe, Super or Custom models, V-8 powered Rebel, 117-inch-wheelbase Ambassador V-8, Ambassador Custom eight-passenger station wagon, miniature Metropolitans, Whitney Darrow, Eldon Dedini, Syd Hoff, George Lichty, Willard Mullin, George Price, rattleproof, Deep Dip rustproofing, Nash, 1954 merger of Nash and Hudson, collector's car market, AMC Ramblers, France's Renault bought into AMC, Chrysler Corporation bought AMCNext up the scale was the illustrated Rambler Six, also available as a Deluxe, Super or Custom. The V-8 powered Rebel looked quite similar to the Rambler Six in styling and was available in the same three editions.

Top of the AMC line for 1960 was the 117-inch-wheelbase Ambassador V-8: Deluxe, Super or Custom. The most expensive Ambassador Custom eight-passenger station wagon was priced at $3,151, plus extras (automatic transmission, power steering, overdrive, air conditioning, etc.)

The lowest-priced AMC models were the miniature Metropolitans, at $1,725 (coupe) or $1,749 (convertible).

During 1960, American Motors carried on an appealing series of color magazine ads for the Rambler Six and Rebel V-8, employing the talents of several of America’s leading panel cartoonists. Cartoons were mixed in with photos of the real cars and real people, and among the cartoonists engaged for the colorful displays were Whitney Darrow, Eldon Dedini, Syd Hoff, George Lichty, Willard Mullin, George Price and others.

Rambler was a pioneer in the low-priced field with modern single-unit body/frame construction – “stronger, longer-lasting, rattleproof.” Front seats could be moved back and forth separately, with reclining seatbacks and adjustable headrests.

“Deep Dip” rustproofing, also pioneered by AMC, saved hundreds of dollars in depreciation costs. When people live in coastal areas with salt air and fog, or in states where roads are heavily salted in winter, they can appreciate this particular feature.

Originally, Rambler was an early-day ancestor of Nash and the AMC cars, until 1913. It was replaced by the 1914 Jeffery, which, in turn, was replaced by the 1917 Nash. Later, Nash revived the Rambler name in 1950 for an all-new compact-sized car, and the Rambler continued long after the 1954 merger of Nash and Hudson, which brought forth American Motors Corporation.

AMC Ramblers have never been “hot” items in the collector’s car market, but they are respected for their dependability, longevity and fuel economy, and they have their loyal admirers.

In the early 1980s, France’s Renault bought into AMC, and a few years later Chrysler Corporation bought AMC, mainly to get Jeep (which had become an AMC property in ’69-’70). Both Jeep and Eagle vehicles continue today, acquistions from Chrysler’s buyout of AMC.

Title, Title, Who’s Got The Title

Title, Title, Who’s Got The Title
By Mark C. Bach

A title is issued by a state agency to document the legal ownership of a car. Now with fifty states, there are at least fifty sets of rules but here are some basic rules and information.

Frequently, when cars are being sold, the seller starts rummaging through their “important stuff” (file/drawer/shoebox) and may discover that they can’t find the title. That’s an easy fix. Just go down to the local Motor Vehicle Department (MVD) or whatever your state/county calls it and ask for a duplicate title.

Some titles might show a lien on them. A lien establishes that a person, typically a lender, has a monetary interest in the car. Some states now actually send the paper title of new cars to the lien holder and the owner only gets the actual title when the loan is paid off. Generally when the lien is paid off, the loan company will issue a lien release, indicating that the lien is no longer necessary. So a car owner can either get a new title showing the line is removed or hang on to the paperwork and hope they can find it when they get around to selling the car.

But sometimes the “owner” may not have the title. Perhaps the car was given to him by a relative and no paperwork ever changed hands. Maybe the car was given to forgive a debt (or even the mechanic’s lien) and again no paperwork followed along. Somebody might have left it behind when they sold a house or left an apartment. In these cases the “owner” won’t have a title.

If you are the buyer, I would strongly suggest you have the seller do the following work, but if somehow you bought the car and now find no title is coming here is what you can do.

At least start with a bill of sale. Have the “owner” execute a sales agreement to start some chain of proof. Now have some government official at your MVD office look over the car and do a VIN (Vehicle Identification Number) inspection, even if the official VIN plate has disappeared. There are typically some extra stampings that can be checked. Assuming a VIN is located and it isn’t presently listed stolen, the state should give you some indication of which state and to whom it was last registered. You’ll have to attempt to reach out to the last known owner (certified mail is your friend) and seek a title through them.

Once you can show a good faith effort to seek out past owners and still can’t find anyone, the state will require you to post a bond for a “bonded title.” If the state says the bond needs to be for $10,000 based on the car’s value, that bond amount will be used to help settle an ownership dispute. Most insurance agencies are familiar with these bonds and can get you one for a few hundred dollars for a three-year bond. Remind them how much you pay out for auto/life and home insurance if they aren’t very helpful or willing to issue you a bond. Generally, most states require you to maintain the bonded title for three years and then you can apply for a clear title. And if the VIN plate was removed, the state can attach and issue you a state ID tag which replaces the manufacturer’s VIN tag.

If you are thinking of selling your car with Auto Round-Up start looking for your ownership papers now, before the buyers start calling! If you find a car being sold without a title, be prepared for some paperwork, standing in lines with bureaucrats and the possibility of your “new to you” car being reported stolen.

I always advise people not to do ANYTHING on a car until you have a clean title in your hand. It would be terrible to do $8,000 in paint and body work on somebody else’s stolen car!
© 2013

The information provided is for informational purposes only and not for the purpose of providing legal or financial advice. You should contact your attorney or financial advisor/accountant to obtain advice with respect to any particular issue or problem. The opinions of the author may not reflect the opinions of Auto Round-Up and/or its subsidiaries.