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The 1916 Cadillac Victoria

The official Cadillac Victoria model name on this coupe does not seem appropriate, as a Victoria coupe usually has a back seat, a longer cab and an ample-size window behind each door.

The 1916 Cadillac Victoria, Tad Burness, Auto Round-Up, back seat, longer cab, ample-size windows, Landaulet coupe of 1915, convertible, first V-8 engine in the 1915 model, 1902, large luxury car with the 1915 V-8 engine, motor carsThis so-called Victoria replaced the more window-full Landaulet coupe of 1915, and was one of Cadillac’s best-looking cars for the 1916 season. The decorative landau irons on either side gave this coupe the look of a convertible, and the tiny opera windows on either side lent added class. As you’ll notice, the body of this coupe towered majestically above the ground, dwarfing the ladies who display some of 1916’s fashions in this illustration.

Cadillac had introduced its first V-8 engine in the 1915 model (in the latter months of 1914), and in late 1915, the new 1916 models arrived with a more stylish curve to the roofline, a higher hood more in harmony with the cab and a new four-door sedan to replace the 1915 center-door type.

By 1916, Cadillac had grown from the little one-cylinder “putt-putt” of 1902 to a large luxury car with the 1915 V-8 engine being a crowning achievement.

According to an original 1916 Cadillac advertisement (published in Travel magazine in April 1916), “The prestige of a motor car no longer depends on mere name, surrounded by a fictitious atmosphere of aristocracy.”

“The only aristocracy in motor cars, now, is an aristocracy of merit,” the ad continued, stating that Cadillac’s reputation was gained by its quality, not by name alone.

The Studebaker National Museum

The Studebaker National Museum
By Scott “Scooter” Strenzel

The Studebaker National Museum, Scott Strenzel, Scooter, Auto Round-Up, South Bend IN, vintage dealership Lark neon sign, Auto/Truck Round-Up, Studebaker carriages for presidents like Abe Lincoln, Studebaker Conestoga wagon, Studebaker military vehicles, air-cooled rear engine flat 4-cylinder Lark, Avanti, 1909 electric-forward/backward dual-controlled car, car shows, racecar, Bullet Nose Studebakers, Golden  Hawks, 50’s woody wagon, automobile historyStudebaker did it right long before most of them were even around. A while back, Scooter was privy to check out this 50,000-square foot facility on Chapin Street in South Bend, IN. I have to give a heartfelt thanks to Jo, Andy and Drew for the red carpet treatment they gave me. In doing so, they gave me answers to any and all questions I could muster with a smile. Thank you.

OK, when walking inside the front doors you know right away this is going to be a class act. The museum store is right there with so much cool stuff, it would take half of the day just to come to grips with the number of things that you might be up for. Passing by that area, you are greeted by a large vintage dealership Lark neon sign, light up in red.

I have to stop here to remind all of you Auto/Truck Round-Up readers that Studebaker is a corporation that had 150 years of production. That fact takes them back to before the motor car was invented. Heck, I got to stand about a foot away from just a few of the Studebaker carriages for presidents like Abe Lincoln, and presidents, Harrison, McKinley, and Grant. That collection happens to be the largest collection of them in the world. They even have the exact carriage that President Lincoln rode in to attend the event that was his demise.

The Studebaker National Museum, Scott Strenzel, Scooter, Auto Round-Up, South Bend IN, vintage dealership Lark neon sign, Auto/Truck Round-Up, Studebaker carriages for presidents like Abe Lincoln, Studebaker Conestoga wagon, Studebaker military vehicles, air-cooled rear engine flat 4-cylinder Lark, Avanti, 1909 electric-forward/backward dual-controlled car, car shows, racecar, Bullet Nose Studebakers, Golden  Hawks, 50’s woody wagon, automobile historyThen I saw a Studebaker Conestoga wagon, and a bunch of WW I and WW II vehicles with correct clothing and related period, proper artifacts. There are many other Studebaker military vehicles on display that saw service for five different wars back as far as the civil war. This floor was just one of the three that make up this fine facility. I was amazed of the collection that was on display on that same floor that was dubbed the “visible storage” area. Down there I saw a few proto type/concept car, including an air-cooled rear engine flat 4-cylinder Lark and wagon with a convertible roof that did see some production, plus a black and silver 2-door concept car with hidden headlights and either some or all fiberglass body parts, and it wasn’t an Avanti.

The list goes on in scores, like the 1909 electric-forward/backward dual-controlled car that the U.S. government had Studebaker build to be run in a tunnel that ran between the U.S. Senate building and the U.S. Capitol. Yes, Studebaker built over 1,800 electric vehicles between the years of 1902 and 1912.

The Studebaker National Museum, Scott Strenzel, Scooter, Auto Round-Up, South Bend IN, vintage dealership Lark neon sign, Auto/Truck Round-Up, Studebaker carriages for presidents like Abe Lincoln, Studebaker Conestoga wagon, Studebaker military vehicles, air-cooled rear engine flat 4-cylinder Lark, Avanti, 1909 electric-forward/backward dual-controlled car, car shows, racecar, Bullet Nose Studebakers, Golden  Hawks, 50’s woody wagon, automobile historyThen I went back up to the entry-level displays. I’ll simply have try to just hit the high spots on what is there, as it would take a book the size of the Chicago yellow pages to type a paragraph about each different and unique Studebaker on display there. How about a 1924 all aluminum Light Six, blue coupe made in Shanghai, China? And a green one that did a whopping 25,000 miles in less than 23,000 minutes. Then there is a two-tone brown Studebaker that held the trans-continental record from New York to San Francisco in 77 hours and 40 minutes. I checked out a kind of mini-Hearse that was a special build to give children a youth-sized funeral vehicle to haul a smaller casket.

It just keeps going on every few steps that you take. There is a white rear door brass-lighted, wood-rimmed Studebaker with red leather interior that looked as classy and comfortable as a new MB.

The Studebaker National Museum, Scott Strenzel, Scooter, Auto Round-Up, South Bend IN, vintage dealership Lark neon sign, Auto/Truck Round-Up, Studebaker carriages for presidents like Abe Lincoln, Studebaker Conestoga wagon, Studebaker military vehicles, air-cooled rear engine flat 4-cylinder Lark, Avanti, 1909 electric-forward/backward dual-controlled car, car shows, racecar, Bullet Nose Studebakers, Golden  Hawks, 50’s woody wagon, automobile historyIt was then time to just sit down and gather up the notes and check the camera batteries. I would say that basically this is not a museum that just has a bunch of typical models we can see at local car shows. The 20’s and 30’s racecar row was impressive, as well as the record-holding, fiberglass-bodied Avanti; plus the Commander Studebaker car that appeared in the 1979 Muppet movie was on display. There were many of the late 40’s and 50’s examples of the famous Bullet Nose Studebakers on display as well. I saw many different years of the Golden Hawks, Larks and many super-charged models, and even a maroon 50’s woody wagon. The 30’s vehicles had some very appealing color combos that would rival today’s flashy stuff. And the ladies should be impressed with the Costume Case that has a stellar collection of correct-period costumes and related items. Golly, I’m just beginning and its word count limit time. If you are not a Studebaker owner, or if you happen to have a barn full of them, you deserve to check out this piece of automobile history.

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1924 Light Six built in Shanghai, China

The Baddest Muscle Car Ever? You Decide!

The Baddest Muscle Car Ever? You Decide!
By Greg Zyla

Q: Hi Greg, I enjoy reading your articles I see in Auto/Truck Round-Up and Auto Round-Up every month. My letter deals with the 1962 Chevy Biscayne 409 as when I was a young lad of 5-years-old, my dad bought one right off the showroom floor.

I thought and still do think it was one of the “baddest” muscle cars of that era. It was bluish green, had a Hurst 4-speed and even “cut out” exhaust. I remember a tachometer, too, and those huge valve covers.

I live in western New York and I remember my dad driving our car to Indianapolis for the drag races, where he raced it in the completely stock class. All he did was uncap the exhaust and he took home a first place trophy.

If I remember, it had two four barrels and forget what it said for the horsepower. Can you tell me about how many were made that year and the different engines and horses on these 409s?

I am a truck driver and in the late 1970s, I drove a semi-truck with a 409 in it. I would be tickled to death to see this in the magazine as I have a subscription to all three of the Auto Round-Up Publications. Brian Lock, Silver Creek, NY

••This pristine 1962 Chevy Biscayne 409 is for sale at RK Motors in Charlotte, NC, for $55,900. (Photo compliments RK Motors.) A: Brian, my favorite muscle car list includes the 1962 Chevy 409, available in Impala (sports coupe top), Bel Air (bubble top coupe) and Biscayne (2-door sedan top).

Although the favorite of the drag racers who toured nationally was the ’62 bubble top Bel Air, the Biscayne was more popular than the Impala in drag racers eyes, thanks to its lighter weight. Thus, your dad’s 409 Biscayne today is one of the top muscle cars ever, thanks to the dual quad, 409-cubic inch V8 coupled to a strong 4-speed transmission.

It’s no surprise you once drove a truck with a 409 engine, as the 348 truck engine became the powerful 409 in 1961. Through 1964, the 348 was still utilized in trucks, buses and dump trucks regularly, while a Tri-Power three two 348 appeared in the 1958 Impala and then full line Chevys through 1960 for the muscle car wars.

As for numbers, in 1962 only 8,909 total 409s were built. Although I do not have a breakdown on each model, it would be safe to assume that the Biscayne was the lowest production number as the Impala SS and Bel Air bubble tops were more popular. This results in today’s recognition of the Biscayne models.

As for horsepower, two 1962 409s were available in 11-1 compression, solid lifter dress. The first was a single 4-barrel at 380 horses, the second your dad’s 2×4 dual quad 409, with 409 horsepower.

Today, these cars command top dollar at Mecum and Barrett-Jackson auctions in pristine shape, and even bring a good amount of money when they are not perfect. Hope you enjoyed the column, Brian, and thanks for the trip down memory lane.

This 1950 F-1 Ford Is This Way By Popular Demand

This 1950 F-1 Ford Is This Way By Popular Demand
Scooter’s Truck Stop
By Scott Strenzel, aka Scooter

1950 F-1 Ford, Scooters Truck Stop, Scott Strenzel, Truck Round-Up, Auto Round-Up, Onsted Kiwanis, Michigan International Speedway Show Car Nationals, 1950 Ford 1/2 ton pickup truck, 360 V-8, 1968 F-100 in the garage, NOSR panelScooter got the invite to cover the Onsted Kiwanis–The Michigan International Speedway Show Car Nationals chaired by Brian Ahern. I was running around compiling information and saw a crowd by something on display. Turned out it was a cool 1950 Ford 1/2 ton pickup truck, owned by 24-year old John Hutchins. It has more than the gross weight limit of natural patina that everyone has been telling him to leave the way it is. And so, John had begun to like the idea of a mechanically perfect driveable piece of history without having to worry about dust, dirt and fingerprints, etc. Besides, he also has a shiny, built-up, 360 V-8, 1968 F-100 in the garage too.

He and his father found out about it at a swap meet a few years ago. They took a drive and had the guy fire up his vintage John Deere and haul it out of the barn with the brakes locked up and flat tires. The deal was made and the work began. John has since installed a complete wiring harness; every piece of the stock brake system you can buy and the same for the fuel system as well the generator, starter, battery, regulator, and related parts and pieces. Plus, he tore out the totally shot and wrong motor and replaced it with a correct flathead that has been rebuilt including the carburetor. He has had to replace the driver’s window, the windshield and rear glass. It has a stock 6-volt system and he has even put on a set of new correct tube-type 16” bias ply blackwalls with NOS hubcaps on this F-1. The new exhaust system is a single muffler stock setup for it in keeping with the way it was styled.

He also had to replace the rusted floor with a NOSR panel and the three on the floor shifter hump pan to get it weather tight. So now it’s safe and dependable, so he, his mom and his dad can cruise around in each of their Ford pickups with their son. I’d say the Hutchins are true Ford truck people. I love it.

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A 1956 Model 3200 Turns Into A 3100 Model Chevrolet Pickup

A 1956 Model 3200 Turns Into A 3100 Model Chevrolet Pickup
Scooter’s Truck Stop
By Scott Strenzel, aka Scooter from Scooter’s Garage

A 1956 Model 3200 Turns Into A 3100 Model Chevrolet Pickup, Scooter's Truck Stop, Scott Strenzel, Scooter's Garage, Truck Round-Up, Auto Round-Up, 1956 farm truck, restoring, 3/4 ton step side long box, 3100 short box model, ‘70s Ventura front clip, Caddy tilt and telescopic steering column, Mark IV air conditioning unit, straight six 235 engine, aftermarket parts, turbo 350 transmission, HEI distributor, exterior chrome, late 70’s Z-28 Camaro, spinners

Years ago, Ralph Derickson’s neighbor bought a 1956 farm truck from a young guy that was having a divorce. He also ended up not restoring it and sold it to Ralph. First off, Ralph didn’t like the 3/4 ton step side long box look. So he cut 10 inches out of the frame and did all of the rest of the metal work to have it become a 3100 short box model.

What we are looking at took Ralph about three years. He used a ‘70s Ventura front clip, so it has power steering, power disc brakes and a Caddy tilt and telescopic steering column. It’s running an ice cold Mark IV air conditioning unit. The rear end is also from the Pontiac Ventura and its been lowered about six to eight inches. The front end also is down in the weeds about the same amount.

The straight six 235 engine is the one that came with it, but Ralph had it rebuilt and messed with in many ways. It would take a whole separate article to cover it all. I will hit the high spots. It has a raft of aftermarket parts that have it now running a hard-to-make-happen 2-barrel Carter/ Weber dual carb setup with polished stainless headers. Ralph also is running a turbo 350 transmission. It has a HEI distributor and as you can see, the entire engine has exterior chrome and has been detailed to the max.

Those cool wheels began life on a late 70’s Z-28 Camaro and have the spinners added that cover up the system it takes to remove a wheel.

The refinished bed also has been refinished to a show level.
And, Truck Round-Up readers, it’s being driven a lot.

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A 1956 Model 3200 Turns Into A 3100 Model Chevrolet Pickup, Scooter's Truck Stop, Scott Strenzel, Scooter's Garage, Truck Round-Up, Auto Round-Up, 1956 farm truck, restoring, 3/4 ton step side long box, 3100 short box model, ‘70s Ventura front clip, Caddy tilt and telescopic steering column, Mark IV air conditioning unit, straight six 235 engine, aftermarket parts, turbo 350 transmission, HEI distributor, exterior chrome, late 70’s Z-28 Camaro, spinners

The Dale Crum 2000 F-650 Ford

The Dale Crum 2000 F-650 Ford
Scooter’s Truck Stop

Dale Crum is a Truck Round-Up subscriber and a truck guy big time, literally. He just plain wanted something different and to be able to tow whatever he felt like and not put his truck to a strain doing it. Plus, he is a custom car/truck fan.

The Dale Crum 2000 F-650 Ford, Scooter's Truck Stop, Auto Round-Up, Truck Round-Up, custom car, custom truck, Jack White Signs and Graphics, Boyz Fabrication Shop, F-Series, stock 26’x12’ high van box straight truck, custom bed rails, custom exhaust system, chrome, F-250 truck, F-650I wish you could see this machine at night time. All of the graphics are setup by Dale’s buddies Jack and Denny over at Jack White Signs and Graphics. Dale also has to give credit for all of the welding as well as some of the required parts to Rick and Andy at Boyz Fabrication Shop. I have to tell you all that have to be reminded, that Dale’s cool F-Series started out as a stock 26’x12’ high van box straight truck.

The custom bed rails are chrome and it has a custom exhaust system. You have to realize they don’t make a 22.5-inch rimed pickup truck. It’s all custom work from top to bottom. It’s running a 5.9 liter Cummins turbo-charged straight six cylinder diesel engine that’s been hooked up to a 6-speed manual transmission. He also told me that it gets better mileage than his F-250 truck. It has an air conditioning system, a backup camera, and you’d think it would have some typical semi-style air horns, nope–it’s running a set of much louder train horns.

Dale said he and his buddies had to attend swap meets in Ohio, Pennsylvania and as far away as North Carolina to get the stuff they wanted and needed for the truck. To sum this up, my man Dale told me that the best part of his truck was the male bonding with his buddies getting his far out F-650 done.

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THE 1947 DODGE HEAVY-DUTY TRUCK

THE 1947 DODGE HEAVY-DUTY TRUCK
1947 Dodge Heavies: Scarcer Than The Lighter-Capacity Pickups
By Tad Burness

THE 1947 DODGE HEAVY-DUTY TRUCK, 1947 Dodge Heavies, lighter-capacity pickups, Tad Burness, Auto Round-Up, 1947 Dodge heavy-duty conventional trucks resembled the 1947 Dodge pickups, 1948 Dodge restyled trucks, Chevrolet and Ford trucks also restyled for 1948, 1949 trucks, mid-1970s Dodge pickups, International, Mack, Kenworth, Peterbuilt, 1975 International, 1961 to 1980, big V-10Stylewise, the 1947 Dodge heavy-duty conventional trucks resembled the 1947 Dodge pickups but were somewhat larger. This particular Dodge truck styling cycle had continued since 1939, with only minor changes.

In 1948, Dodge trucks were to be dramatically restyled with an all-new postwar look. Chevrolet and Ford trucks also restyled for 1948. But strangely, Dodge, Chevrolet and Ford cars were not restyled until the 1949 season, even though cars were frequently restyled in advance of their truck counterparts.

This ’47 Dodge heavy-duty model is considerably scarcer than the smaller pickup version. And, after the mid-1970s Dodge pickups continued with success, but their heavy models were dropped. Dodge left the heavy-duty market to others, particularly to the specialists in that field, like International, Mack, Kenworth, Peterbuilt, etc.

In 1975, International did just the opposite from what Dodge did; International built its last pickup, van and wagon that year, and built nothing but heavy-duty models after that (with the exception of its sport-utility Scout, which it offered from 1961 to 1980).

Because Dodge now offers engines as large as its big V-10, that powerful multicylinder unit could be used in some new series of “heavies” should Dodge choose to build them in the future.

1942 Ford Jeep

1942 Ford Jeep
A Carbon Copy Of The Better-Known Willys Version
By Tad Burness

There really was such a thing as a Ford Jeep during World War II. No kidding! As a kid, I, too, found this hard to believe.

1942 Ford Jeep, Willys Version, Tad Burness, Auto Round-Up, Ford Jeep during World War II, Willys-Overland Company built the majority of Jeeps, Ford Jeeps are extremely rare todayI used to spend some vacation time at my uncle’s ranch, which was near two bustling Army camps. My cousins setup a roadside soft-drink stand in front of their house, which was situated at a crossroad where Army convoys frequently passed. We sold bottled sodas to the soldiers, and did a fairly good business. One day, a couple of soldiers pulled up in a Jeep, and informed me that it was a Ford–not a Willys! I wondered about that, but was shown the Ford name on the Jeep and was truly surprised.

Did it have its own Ford-designed engine? No, I later learned. The Ford Jeeps were created in the exact image of the Willys model, so that all parts were interchangeable between the two brands. Willys had been building tens of thousands of Jeeps for the military since 1941, but they soon needed assistance from another manufacturer in order to produce enough for the war effort.

Below the illustrated Ford Jeep, you’ll notice reproductions of two of the metal plates carried on each Ford Jeep, as evidence. Note the Ford name on the fourth line down, on the left-hand plate.

Since Willys-Overland Company built the majority of Jeeps, and since Ford stopped building their copies once the emergency was over, you’ll find that Ford Jeeps are extremely rare today. I haven’t seen one since those pop-peddling days at the ranch.